Shona Mackenzie. BA Hons PG Dip

I am from the small village of Dull near Aberfeldy, where I still live. I attended Duncan of Jordanstone college of Art in Dundee and Grays school of Art in Aberdeen where I attained a BA honours degree in Textile design and a post graduate diploma in surface decoration and constructed textiles.  Have done much work within the textile industry, working through commercial agents and other designers, to designing and co running a small children's clothing company. 

In the last few years I have decided to concentrate on my painting which has always run alongside my textile work - the canvas being a natural home to natural decoration.

I am truly inspired by all the treescapes and landscapes that surround me in this small part of Scotland. I love the repeating patterns and repeating units. All have slight variations, these could be squares of fields, rolls of straw, or strips of trees down a burnside. 

The weather and the seasons also bring their own moods, this can be airy, light, happy or dark ominous which shifts the light , colour and patterns through the landscape. It can also bring noise ,loud and reckless or soft and gentle, or it can be silent except for small bird song. The colours changing from year to year, one side of a leaf changing as it flips in the breeze. Barks, twigs ,leaves all have different colour and texture depending on the variety of tree, from sycamore to ash and birch to poplar to larch and spruce and pine, each variety having there own gait as they sit in an ever changing  landscape. 

I am always striving to capture that moment, that feeling, that mood and colour in my painting as I stop, look and record. I would like the viewer to feel that they are in that moment, that mood, that time too

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